About Mane Adige

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"Mane Adige" means "Home Food" in kannada and this blog is all about recipes that I cook. Most of the recipes I post here will be from "Mangalooru" and "Bengalooru " regions of Karnataka,India. Rest of them are the one's which I try out by improvising the recipes got from different sources.

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Moode/Mude ("Kedige" Flavored Idlis)

        

This ones a very traditional Mangalorean recipe! Idli batter is filled into moulds made of a certain variety of leaf, known as Kedige in Kannada (English: Screw Pine. Read more here). These leafy moulds add a distinct flavor and aroma to the idlis that makes them really unique and delicious! Moode is made on special occasions like festivals and weddings. These kedige leaf moulds, more popularly known as "moode ele" are available in most vegetable markets during festive season. For those of you that have never seen moode  ele, here's how the moulds look

          

Here is how to make it...

Ingredients:

1 cup urad dal (Soaked in water for about 4-6 hours)

2 cups idli rava / White rice (Soak white rice in water for 4-6 hours)

Salt as per taste

 

Method:

  1. Grind the soaked urad dal to a smooth dal until it froths up and increases in quantity.
  2. Wash the idli rava and drain out all the water; Add rava to the urad batter and grind further until it blends well with the batter (About 3-5 minutes). If you are using soaked white rice, drain out all the water and add to urad batter; Grind until it blends well and forms a smooth paste.
  3. Transfer into a large mixing bowl and let ferment overnight or for 8-10 hours; Add salt and mix well.
  4. Pour into moode ele (kedige moulds) and steam cook for about 20-25 minutes; Moode is done when no grains stick to the fork when pierced.
  5. Remove from stove and serve hot with coconut chutney, sambhar, gashi or any other side dish of your choice.

Note:

  • If you are grinding urad dal using the blender, it generally takes about 10-15 minutes for the batter to froth up; Make sure you stop every 5-7 mins and mix with a spatula. In case of a grinder, it takes about 25-30 minutes.
  • While storing the batter for fermenting, make sure the bowl is large enough to accommodate the rise in batter quantity.
  • While pouring the batter into moode ele, fill it only up to three fourths.... Moode will rise further while it cooks.
  • I use a pressure cooker (without weight) to steam idlis and moode. You could also use idli cookers that are available in the market. In either case, add enough water at the bottom to withstand 20 minutes of steaming.
  • It is important to ensure that moode ele stays upright while it cooks. You wouldn't want the moode to fall off and let the water from the bottom of the cooker get in. So, I place each moode separately inside long steel tumblers.
  • To remove the moode from the mould, slowly pull out the tiny sticks that hold the mould together; The mould will fall apart automatically.

17 comments:

AshKuku said...

oh yes! The moode or kotte or kottige..... I love the prep.... but as far as my knowledge goes, popularly prepared in the pyramid shaped moulds made with jackfruit leaves...... At least that is what we make.... Other than that I have heard & seen them being prepared similarly as your pics with moulds made of banana leaves..... Be it whateva, I love this prep.... That is our Chauti special at home in Bangalore...... :)

Ash...
(http://asha-oceanichope.blogspot.com/)

Mona said...

Never heard or seen those kind of moulds ever before. Very interesting.

Shama Nagarajan said...

yummy recipe dear

DEESHA said...

this looks totally delish .. BTW is this also called Kotte Kadbu ??

Prathibha said...

I have tasted them and I loved the taste instantly...Those tube shaped moulds look gr8/...

Ashwini said...

looks yummy :) I suppose preparation requires lots of patience

Priya said...

Woww wat a wonderful looking moode..

Anonymous said...

nice where did you get these moulds? Do you have a recipe for any paldya?

Pavithra Kodical said...

I am drooling here..Love moode, unfortunately we cannot find those leaves here.. The aroma of the moode kadubu is wonderful, lucky you :)

Dipi said...

Your moode looks amazing !! Its so nice to finally have a blog with some authentic recipes !! Keep posting... I love your recipes :)

~dipi

Sush said...

I always eat them at Kamat's near the Janapada loka. Tastes awesome. My aunt's prepare kotte kadubu using Jackfruit leaves.
Missing India now :(
Happy Deepavali.

Sharmilee! :) said...

Wow this sounds new to me...looks soft n yum

Tristan said...

This looks really good but maybe a little advanced for me XD

Shimogait said...

Good job Ramya....

Now this is reminding me of mom making idli in jackfruit leaf donne.. "Khotte"...

shruthipramod said...

i m proud to be a mangalorean!!!!!!!!moode tastes heavenly with chicken curry....moode is prepared usually on janmastami / ganesh chaturti....if kedige mould is not available,the batter can also be put in tall steel tumblers which resembles the mould....ofcourse u won't get the flavor of the leaves....but atleast u can prepare the authentic mangalore dish!!!!!!!!

Sundar Matpadi said...

Saw this blog today and thought will comment on the kottige. In South Kanara, these type of idlis are called kadubu. When we were young, we used to make the kottige (mould) in our village which is closer to Udupi. These leaves used to grow in our village a lot. These have thorns in them, so it needs to be handled very carefully. Once they are cut from the plant (more like shrub), remove the thorns using the knife. Afterwards slight burn / heat them over fire. This gives good aroma. Afterwards, we make the kottige. Kadubu made in this leaf have special flavor also the type of rice matters. We usually used to use the rice that used to be cultivated in our land. Thanks for bringing back old memories.

Vemula Madhu said...

interesting way to prepare
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